Saturday, April 27, 2013

This Protean Love



Each of us was asked to provide the inspiration beyond their Science Fiction story in the collection Hey, That Robot Ate My Baby.  This is mine.


This Protean Love: 
Adelita Marie Salazar, the last living border agent of her precinct patrols the Tierras Oscuras, the Dark Lands, in search of her missing brother, encountering killers, and refugees, human, and machine in a futuristic world where the nature of reality is as uncertain as her future. 

This Protean Love began as a solemn prayer, a spiritual love letter to the Mexican women who have fought and died defending their people. I carry their images inked to my skin, and taped to my walls. They are my witness's and my guides.

Women like Maria Santos GorrostietaErika Gandara, and Hermila Garcia

My connection to these women, and this struggle is intimate, and not abstract. It's a deeply personal one. They are kindred spirits.       (Erika Gandara below)


Nothing I could ever write will ever be as powerful as they were in that final moment when they refused to bow, refused to abandon their people. They are heroes in an age where we are desperate for them.

The name Adelita represents the archetype of the warrior woman (Soldaderas) of Mexico and connects to a proud tradition.

I wanted to explore concepts of love, and faith, of duty, and the nature of God and Gods place in our future, as well as acceptance of all life in the symbolic rich tradition of classic literature like Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain and Herman Melville's Moby Dick. This Protean Love is layered with dense numerological coding, and esoteric symbolism. Many books focus their theme on the spiritual but do not use occult or spiritual structures or ritual within the piece itself. They are stilllifes of the numinous, but are not designed with numinous techniques. This Protean Love's structure is metaphysical.

The last and crucial influence is Janelle Monae                                 
Janelle Monae is an artist and person I revere above all others. Her use of the android as the other in her musical opus The ArchAndroid was the humble template for which I have built This Protean Love upon.


In this work with the Wondaland Art Society she immaculately combined three important things: a deep, dense social-conscious message,  a spell-bounding sci-fi visionary story, with beautiful music and art. 

This Protean Love is a beam of light born out of a very deep, personal wound. It is the celebration of the female as a source of inspiration, and power. This Protean Love is my introduction beyond the realm of Noir vignettes, and my introduction into the Zelmer Pulp fold. 
     Thank you. 79797 Isaac Kirkman

The print version is out now for Hey, That Robot Ate My Baby!







Monday, April 22, 2013

TIMEJACKED: THE RAND PARADOX

So it was my idea to write about our inspirations. Blame me for what follows.

TIMEJACKED: THE RAND PARADOX started when someone on Facebook posted the question "If you could fight any historical figure, living or dead, who would it be?" Well, someone answered 'Ayn Rand', and I immediately pictured her in a kung fu pose. That's where it all began.

Halfway through writing, I realized I needed more info on the subject of my story. I read Nathaniel Branden's autobiography about his years with Rand and got quite a lot of insight into her and her philosophy. This was a 300+ page non-fiction book. I read it solely for this short story. I had no real job at the time, so there you go.

So, I wrote the first draft and kicked it around to some writers groups (LitReactor, for one—a fine place to get your skin toughened up for critiques, and PhilCon—a Philadelphia Science Fiction convention, featuring a writers workshop, where I got some more suggestions how to improve it). Once I got the story into a good place, I sent it off to a few sci-fi magazines, but nobody wanted it. I kept adding refinements here and there, but it sat, unloved, much like Ayn Rand in her later years, in my files.

Fast-forward one year, and Sayles and Panowich decide to keep going with their Zelmer Pulp thing (I had designed the first cover). They suggested a sci-fi issue for Volume 2. Ding! Since I was already slated to do the cover, do you think they'd say no, it's crap? Well, they did, but they needed some shlub to paint a cover who was willing to work for homoerotic sexting.

Ryan, why don't you text me any more?

Based on the technobabble science I created for this story, I have another Timejack story on the backburner where a guy goes back to World War 1, over tweaks his enhancements, and causes a cascade of nanodiseases to break out from the trenches. Coming soon. Or maybe not. I have to convince them I have another cover in me.

Hey, That Robot Ate My Baby! Volume 1

Click to buy
The madmen that brought you 2012's legendary zombie epic, C'MON AND DO THE APOCALYPSE VOL 1, are back in your face for the second wave, and this time they brought friends.

Joining Sayles and Panowich on their latest voyage into the world of Science Fiction are three of the hottest writers of genre fiction in the biz, Chris Leek, Isaac Kirkman, and ZELMER PULP cover artist Chuck Regan.

HEY,THAT ROBOT ATE MY BABY VOL. 1 features 5 distinct voices, and 5 mind-bending tales to astonish and offend.

Including:

Timejacked: The Rand Paradox... By Chuck Regan
In the 24th Century, the ultimate form of vanity is to create a personal alternate Earth timeline. Chlör Byzantine, a B-Grade web celebrity, travels to 1957 to stop Ayn Rand from ruining the future... but she is ready and waiting for him.

Wherever The Light Ends...By Ryan Sayles
In 1947, twins sisters disappear from the face of the Earth during the most horrific experience of their lives. Later they are found, and they have new parents, new scars and a desire for a new life. When they die in 2012, shut-ins and with no family and no friends, the results of that one disappearance mark the end for mankind.

Geek Squad 2.0...By Brian Panowich
In the 60’s and 70’s they did it with a bullet. In the 80’s and 90’s they did it with the media, but today if you want someone dead, it’s as easy as a Google search. The Geek Squad, bringing assassination to the modern age, but still can’t get dates for the prom.

The Whores of God...By Chris Leek
Earth in the 22nd Centaury is a nice place to visit, but you wouldn’t want to live there; the moral majority has taken a stand and if you want your kicks in 2132 you have to go off-world to get them. In the international waters of deep space everything is available, for a price. Jensen Corduroy is on a mission to get laid, but the Reverend Ellroy has a much higher purpose, he is on a mission from God.

This Protean Love...By Isaac Kirkman
Adelita Salazar, the last living border agent of her precinct patrols the Tierras Oscuras, the Dark Lands, in search of her missing brother, encountering killers, and refugees, human, and machine in a futuristic world where the nature of reality is as uncertain as her future.

This ain't your Daddy's Science Fiction. This is Zelmer Pulp.

Availabile now from Amazon.

C'mon And Do The Apocalypse Volume 1




Click to buy
Ryan Sayles and Brian Panowich Introduce readers to the Zombie Apocalypse done their way. From tear-jerking to gut-wrenching to hardcore and brutal, all the things Sayles and Panowich have brought to the Indy Noir table are funneled into the world of the undead.

Volume One includes:

1. My Wife Dawn...And The Dead (Panowich)

A recount of the first few hours of the zombie outbreak during an small intimate Christmas party in the suburbs. What happens when a pop culture zombie nerd finds himself the smartest guy in the room, charged with protecting his family and friends on the eve of a real bonafide apocalypse? Probably not what you expect. My wife Dawn is a love story for the end of days.

2. 28 Days of Mutilated Zombie Whores Later (Sayles)

Two years after the the Zombie apocalypse, Nelson runs a new breed of harem on his farm. When his last surviving John arrives with a 'live girl' to trade for Nelson's service, they all experience a micro-apocalypse of their own.

Available now electronically and in print from Amazon.